dig down


dig down
dig down & dig deep
1. Lit. to excavate deeply. •

They are really having to dig deep to reach bedrock.

We are not to the buried cable yet. We will have to dig down some more.

2. Fig. to be generous; to dig deep into one's pockets and come up with as much money as possible to donate to something. (As if digging into one's pocket.) •

Please dig down. We need every penny you can spare.

Dig down deep. Give all you can.

* * *
{v.}, {slang} To spend your own money. * /The school let the club use the bus and driver free for their trip, but they had to dig down to pay for gas and meals./ * /"So you broke Mrs. Brown's window?" Tom's father said, "You'll have to dig down and pay for it,"/

Dictionary of American idioms. 2013.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • dig down — {v.}, {slang} To spend your own money. * /The school let the club use the bus and driver free for their trip, but they had to dig down to pay for gas and meals./ * / So you broke Mrs. Brown s window? Tom s father said, You ll have to dig down and …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • dig\ down — v slang To spend your own money. The school let the club use the bus and driver free for their trip, but they had to dig down to pay for gas and meals. So you broke Mrs. Brown s window? Tom s father said, You ll have to dig down and pay for it …   Словарь американских идиом

  • dig down — intransitive verb : to pay money out of one s own pocket the customers will not dig down for such entertainment …   Useful english dictionary

  • dig down into — index delve Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …   Law dictionary

  • To dig down — Dig Dig (d[i^]g), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Dug} (d[u^]g) or {Digged} (d[i^]gd); p. pr. & vb. n. {Digging}. Digged is archaic.] [OE. diggen, perh. the same word as diken, dichen (see {Dike}, {Ditch}); cf. Dan. dige to dig, dige a ditch; or (?) akin to …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • dig — [n] insult crack, cut, cutting remark, gibe, innuendo, jeer, quip, slur, sneer, taunt, wisecrack; concept 54 Ant. compliment, flattery, praise dig [v1] delve into; hollow out bore, break up, bulldoze, burrow, cat, channel, clean, concave, deepen …   New thesaurus

  • Dig — (d[i^]g), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Dug} (d[u^]g) or {Digged} (d[i^]gd); p. pr. & vb. n. {Digging}. Digged is archaic.] [OE. diggen, perh. the same word as diken, dichen (see {Dike}, {Ditch}); cf. Dan. dige to dig, dige a ditch; or (?) akin to E. 1st… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • dig — dig1 S3 [dıg] v past tense and past participle dug [dʌg] present participle digging [Date: 1100 1200; Origin: Perhaps from Old English dic ditch ] 1.) [I and T] to move earth, snow etc, or to make a hole in the ground, using a ↑spade or your… …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • dig — I. /dɪg / (say dig) verb (dug or, Archaic, digged, digging) –verb (i) 1. to break up, turn over, or remove earth, etc., as with a spade; make an excavation. 2. to make one s way by, or as by, digging. –verb (t) 3. to penetrate and loosen (the… …   Australian English dictionary

  • dig — I (New American Roget s College Thesaurus) v. shovel, spade, excavate, grub, delve; labor, speed; unearth; slang, enjoy (see pleasure). See concavity, exertion. II (Roget s IV) n. 1. [Insult] Syn. gibe, taunt, innuendo, cut; see insult , ridicule …   English dictionary for students


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